Bibliography: Misinformation (page 30 of 30)

This annotated bibliography is compiled and customized for the Alternative Facts website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Harsha N. Mookherjee, Marvin W. Weiss, Rand R. Wilcox, Vivi S. McEuen, Charles O'Reilly, Than Than Zin, RAY W. BARBER, Gary Putka, Farai Chideya, and John Williams.

Mookherjee, Harsha N., Ed. (1977). Rural Sociology in the South, 1977. Proceedings of 1977 Annual Meeting of the Southern Association of Agricultural Scientists, Rural Sociology Section (Atlanta, Georgia, February 6-9, 1977). "Rural Sociology: A Field of Basic and Applied Research" was the theme of the 1977 annual meeting. Participants at the convention heard 50 reports in 14 sessions, as well as five special panels and two special sessions. Most of the papers, research reports and essays presented in the sessions are included in this document and serve as the meeting proceedings. The 44 papers are organized into twelve sections. Section One on population has three papers; Section Two, dealing with quality of life, contains four papers. The third section has two papers on occupations and in the fourth section are seven papers on aspects of education in the rural South. In Section Five are four papers regarding status attainment research; two papers on mental health are in Section Six. Section Seven contains four papers on policy research. "Rural Development and Social Change" is the title of Section Eight which contains six papers. The ninth section has three papers on evaluation of rural development programs and the tenth section has three on environment and recreation. Three papers in Section Eleven treat rural health care services. The "Pot Pourri" section has three papers bearing the titles of "Attitudes Toward Local Police: A New Look at the Racial Variable"; "Misinformation: A Basic Problem for Community Correction Agencies"; and "Comparative Organizational Properties and Interdependence in Interorganizational Dyads". Appendices list meeting participants and the 1977 program of the Rural Sociology Section. Descriptors: American Indians, Area Studies, Career Planning, Citizen Participation

Putka, Gary (1992). Readers of Largest U.S. History Textbooks Discover a Storehouse of Misinformation, Wall Street Journal. Reports that a Texas advocacy group discovered thousands of errors in U.S. history textbooks. Notes that the books underwent the review after drawing favorable reactions from Texas education officials. Identifies possible explanations for the errors and steps being taken to reduce errors in the future. Descriptors: History Instruction, Publishing Industry, Secondary Education, Textbook Content

Chapman, David W.; And Others (1986). Public School Administrators' Knowledge of Recent Supreme Court Decisions Affecting School Practice. Public secondary school administrators should deduce from the 1985 "New Jersey v. T.L.O." Supreme Court decision that searching students does not violate the Constitutional prohibition against unreasonable searches and seizures when there are reasonable grounds for suspicion. The "Wallace v. Jaffree" case, decided in the same year, implies that "moment of silence" policies do not violate the "establishment" clause of the Constitution so long as such policies support secular objectives and so long as other activities are specified if prayer is specified. In December 1985, questionnaires were sent to 139 administrators in central New York to assess their knowledge of these decisions and to identify their sources of legal information. Eighty-eight percent responded. In addition, selected print media were analyzed to examine how accurately popular and professional media reported these decisions and their implications for practice. According to the questionnaire results, more than 25 percent of the respondents did not know that evidence of misbehavior is required before searching a student; 20 to 25 percent had difficulty in applying legal procedures to actual situations; 52 percent reported that they had little or no information about the constitutionality of moment of silence policies; 21 percent thought that all moment of silence policies were unconstitutional; 29 percent were uncertain concerning their constitutionality; and the main sources of information were professional newletters and journals. The analysis of the sources revealed that the sources were generally both accurate and comprehensive, which suggests that the sources were not responsible for the administrators' misinformation. Included are 11 references and 6 tables.   [More]  Descriptors: Administrator Attitudes, Administrators, Court Litigation, Federal Courts

Wilcox, Rand R. (1983). A Simple Model for Diagnostic Testing when There Are Several Types of Misinformation, Journal of Experimental Education. A latent class model for handling the items in Birenbaum and Tatsuoka's study is described. A method to derive the optimal scoring rule when multiple choice test items are used is illustrated. Remedial training begins after a determination is made as to which of several erroneous algorithms is being used. Descriptors: Achievement Tests, Algorithms, Diagnostic Tests, Latent Trait Theory

BARBER, RAY W. (1967). YPSILANTI HUMAN RELATIONS PROGRAM. ATTEMPTS WERE MADE IN THE PROJECT OUTLINED HERE TO MODIFY TEACHER ATTITUDES TOWARD NEGRO CHILDREN, TO EQUIP TEACHERS WITH SKILLS TO DO A BETTER JOB OF TEACHING, TO ACCCOMPLISH THE SAME OBJECTIVES WITH THE SCHOOL PRINCIPALS, AND TO SURVEY BUILDING NEEDS IN TERMS OF CONTINUED DESEGREGATION IN THE SCHOOLS. A CORE GROUP OF TEACHERS WITH PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE WORKING WITH NEGRO CHILDREN SPENT A SEMESTER DEVELOPING RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE WHOLE ELEMENTARY STAFF TO UTILIZE. DURING THE SCHOOL YEAR DISCUSSION GROUPS WERE FORMED ON LANGUAGE ARTS, MOTIVATION AND SELF-CONCEPT, CLASSROOM CONTROL, AND PARENT-COMMUNITY RELATIONSHIPS, AND ORGANIZATIONAL MEETINGS WERE HELD. DURING THE SUMMER EIGHT TEACHERS LEARNED INTERVIEW TECHNIQUES AND MET WITH PARENTS OF 52 NEGRO CHILDREN TO DEVELOP A WARM ONE-TO-ONE RELATIONSHIP BEFORE SCHOOL OPENED IN THE FALL. A FINAL 2-DAY WORKSHOP WAS HELD TO INTRODUCE THE PROGRAM TO NEW TEACHERS. AFTER A VERY GOOD START ONLY A MINORITY OF THE TEACHERS MAINTAINED POSITIVE VIEWS TOWARD THE PROJECT. THEY FELT FORCED TO ATTEND MEETINGS WHICH THEY SAW AS INSULTING, SINCE "ANY GOOD TEACHER KNEW HOW TO TEACH ALL CHILDREN." CHILDREN'S REACTIONS, AS EXPRESSED ON TAPES, REVEALED WIDESPREAD MISINFORMATION AND RESENTMENT, IN SPITE OF THE FACT THAT TEACHERS DID NOT INDICATE THEIR FEELINGS TO THE STUDENTS. THE NEW TEACHER ORIENTATION PRODUCED SIMILAR RESULTS. THE SUMMER PROGRAM, FOR WHICH TEACHERS VOLUNTEERED AND WERE PAID A STIPEND, WAS MUCH MORE SUCCESSFUL, INDICATING THAT REAL LIFE EXPERIENCES ARE MORE VALUABLE THAN LISTENING TO TALKS AND PARTICIPATING IN SMALL DISCUSSION GROUPS. THE BUILDING SURVEY, COMPLETED BY THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN BUREAU OF SCHOOL SERVICES, INDICATES A NEED FOR SEVERAL NEW SCHOOLS AT ALL LEVELS IN THE NEAR FUTURE. A SEPARATE STUDY OF THE TEACHERS' EVALUATION OF THE PROGRAM IS INCLUDED.   [More]  Descriptors: Black Students, Classroom Environment, Disadvantaged Youth, Elementary School Teachers

Haycock, Ken, Ed. (1998). Foundations for Effective School Library Media Programs. This collection of 38 articles, reprinted from "Emergency Librarian," addresses critical elements of school library media program development and implementation, organized by seven areas: foundations; the school context; role clarification; information literacy; collaborative program planning and teaching; program development; and accountability. The following articles are included: (1) "Strengthening the Foundations for Teacher-Librarianship" (Ken Haycock);(2) "Research in Teacher-Librarianship and the Institutionalization of Change" (Ken Haycock);(3) "Leadership for School Improvement" (Jean Brown); (4) "The School Library Program and the Culture of the School" (Dianne Oberg); (5) "Libraries, Learning and the Whole School" (Michael Marland); (6) "The School Librarian as a Professional Teacher" (Ken Haycock); (7) "Navigating the 90s–The Teacher-Librarian as Change Agent" (Jean Brown); (8) "Developing Information Literacy through the Information Intermediary Process" (Kathy Thomas Brock); (9) "Teacher-Librarians" (Jean Brown & Bruce Sheppard); (10) "Students' Information Literacy Needs" (Association for Teacher-Librarianship in Canada & Canadian School Library Association); (11) "Information Literacy in an Information Society" (Christina Doyle); (12) "Media Literacy" (Mary Megee); (13) "Student Access to the Internet" (Doug Johnson); (14) "Misinformation on the Internet" (Mary Ann Fitzgerald); (15) "Information Skills in the Curriculum" (Carol-Ann Page); (16) "Developing a School-Based Research Strategy K-7" (Sharon Straathof); (17) "Computer Literacy and Information Literacy" (Doug Johnson & Mike Eisenberg); (18) "All that Glitters May Not Be Gold" (David Loertscher); (19) "Curriculum Encounters of the Third Kind" (Ray Doiron); (20) "The School Librarian and the Classroom Teacher" (Antoinette Oberg); (21) "Changing Teaching Practice To Meet Current Expectations" (Jean Brown); (22) "Expanding the Collaborative Planning Model" (Patti Hurren); (23) "Collaborative Planning" (Carol-Ann Page); (24) "Developing the School Resource Center Program" (Carol-Ann Page); (25) "From Library Program to Learning Resources Program" (Mary Tarasoff & Sonya Emperingham); (26) "Prerequisites to Flexible Scheduling" (Jean Donham van Deusen); (27) "Secondary School Assignments" (Liz Austrom); (28) "A Stations Approach to Learning" (Debra Simmons); (29)"Connecting Writing and Research through the I-Search Paper" (Julie Tallman); (30) "Designing Thematic Literature Units" (Jean Donham van Deusen & Paula Brandt); (31) "What Do You Believe about How Culturally Diverse Students Learn?" (Rita Dunn, Mark Beasley & Karen Buchanan); (32) "Principals and Teacher-Librarians" (Patricia Wilson, Martha Blake & Josette Lyders); (33) "Communication Skills and Strategies for Teacher-Librarians" (Barbara Howlett); (34) "School Libraries–Definitely Worth Their Keep" (Bev Anderson); (35) "Using Evaluation To Bring School Library Resource Center Programs into Closer Alliance with Information Power" (Doris Epler); (36) "Evaluation" (Linda Rafuse & Ruth Law); (37) "Evaluation of the Teacher-Librarian" (Ken Haycock); and (38) "Theory–Where Is My Reality?" (Susan Casey). Contains an index. Descriptors: Accountability, Cooperative Planning, Cooperative Programs, Curriculum Development

McEuen, Vivi S.; And Others (1989). A National Survey of Graduate Education in Communication Research Ethics. This study was conducted to determine the status of Ph.D. communication education in research ethics. The study sought to discover the extent to which research ethics courses are being taught, identify the research ethics issues that are discussed in these courses or in research methods coursework, specify the reading material that are assigned in the area of research ethics, and inquire as to how instructors of research ethics acquired their own knowledge of research ethics. Fifty-nine Ph.D. communication programs in the United States were surveyed through a mail questionnaire. A 77% response rate was achieved. Results indicate that no Ph.D. communication program in the survey currently devotes an entire course to communication research ethics. Seventy percent of the programs surveyed offer a course partly dealing with ethics. In these courses, research ethics tend to be discussed 15% or less of total course time. "Lack of room in the curriculum" and "ethics issues adequately addressed in other courses" were the primary reasons cited for not devoting an entire course to research ethics. Issues dealing with confidentiality, informed consent, subjects' rights to withdraw, and institutional review boards were discussed to the greatest extent in coursework related to research ethics. The least discussed issues were involuntary self knowledge, the importance of information in final write-ups allowing for the assessment of ethical conduct, misinformation, "fudging" of data, the responsibility of the researcher to benefit society, physical/psychological harm, and the mechanics of debriefing. A limited range of reading materials on research ethics appear to be used, largely drawn from outside the discipline. Most instructors acquired their research ethics knowledge from experience doing research, personal reading, and informal conversation with colleagues. No instructors in the survey who teach coursework at least partially devoted to research ethics have themselves taken a separate course in research ethics at the graduate level. Approximately 67% indicated having taken a course at the graduate level partially devoted to research ethics.   [More]  Descriptors: Communication Research, Doctoral Programs, Ethics, Graduate Study

Chideya, Farai (1995). Don't Believe the Hype. Fighting Cultural Misinformation about African-Americans. This book is designed to give readers enough information to question the depictions of blacks that have become standard in newspapers and television and radio news. Chapter-by-chapter, it provides facts about the African-American community that often run counter to prevailing ideas. Americans of different races still tend not to live together or socialize together, and what they know about one another is often passed through the filter of the media, which tend to focus on the extremes of our culture. The book is divided into the following parts: (1) Round One: Nature v. Nurture; (2) The Education of Black America; (3) Money and Power; and (4) The Structures of Society. The section on education emphasizes that high school graduation rates for African Americans have risen sharply in the past two decades, and that while 16 percent of students are black, only about 8 percent of teachers are African American. Several urban initiatives to improve education are discussed. Each chapter contains references. Descriptors: Black Community, Black Education, Blacks, Cultural Awareness

Zin, Than Than; Williams, John (1991). Searching for Better Scoring of Multiple-Choice Tests: Proper Treatment of Misinformation, Guessing and Partial Knowledge. Brief explanations are presented of some of the different methods used to score multiple-choice tests; and some studies of partial information, guessing strategies, and test-taking behaviors are reviewed. Studies are grouped in three categories of effort to improve scoring: (1) those that require extra effort from the examinee to answer multiple-choice questions compared to the conventional mode of selecting the best or correct option among two or more choices; (2) those that manipulate test items or instructions; and (3) those that analyze original responses in special ways. The alternative scoring models of these studies have not provided a comprehensive picture of response behaviors because the manner in which they have been set up is fragmentary, and their assumptions are specific for the response mode for which the model was designed. A more generalized modeling approach is apparent in the finite state score theory of performance on multiple-choice tests proposed by M. A. Garcia-Perez (1987). Finite state score theory parsimoniously incorporates assumptions appropriate to the particular mode in which the test is administered, and it yields ability estimates on a single metric that remains the same regardless of the mode of test administration or assumptions concerning examinee behavior. The theory awaits empirical testing, but seems to be adaptable to any assumptions about item characteristics. Consequently, it appears to be a promising trend in measurement. A 31-item list of references is included. Descriptors: Educational Research, Estimation (Mathematics), Guessing (Tests), Literature Reviews

O'Reilly, Charles; O'Reilly, Rosella (1987). The Gourman Report: Misinformation about the Quality of Graduate Social Work Education, Research in Higher Education. Despite criticism because the author refuses to provide information about his methodology, "The Gourman Report" is used as an authoritative reference by prospective students and researchers in higher education. Deans, university librarians, and offices of institutional research were asked if they shared information with Gourman and they all responded no. Descriptors: Credibility, Educational Quality, Graduate Study, Higher Education

Weiss, Marvin W. (1977). The Community College Role in Community Education–Misunderstanding or Misinformation?, Adult Leadership. A survey of community educators substantiates the assumption that the neighborhood schools will not lose local control if there are cooperative agreements with community colleges, and that community schools and community colleges should jointly concern themselves with local problems, such as community development, course needs, and recreation. Descriptors: Change Strategies, College School Cooperation, Community Colleges, Community Cooperation

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