Bibliography: Propaganda (page 59 of 66)

This bibliography is reformatted and customized for the Alternative Facts website. Some of the authors featured on this page include Albert E. Holliday, Joyce Flory, David H. Weaver, Walton H. Owens, John C. Smyth, Philip Zimbardo, EDWARD B. JENKINSON, Calder M. Pickett, Judith Hackman, and Harold Brodsky.

Gordon, George N. (1971). Persuasion: The Theory and Practice of Manipulative Communication. Drawing together both the history of persuasion as an historical facet of civilization and current practice, and speculation concerning its many manifestation in modern life, this book attempts to review persuasive communication–interpersonal, social, and mass-oriented–from the influences of society to the influences of the mass media. The first chapters make up a general introduction to the study of the intentional aspects of communication and the history of persuasion. Part two considers logical perspectives–those aspects of persuasion which are mainly historical and analytical in thrust, centering upon how and when persuasion occurs in society and how it is employed in major cultural institutions. The third part centers on psychological perspectives and is largely concerned with discrete processes that persuade people to modify dispositions and change actions. An attempt is made to explain why these modifications may or may not occur according to current psychological theory. Part four examines some contemporary beliefs, ideas, and myths concerning persuasion relevant to matters that are of social, political, and cultural concern to Western civilization. Part five discusses how "futurism" as persuasion may constrict free will and the ramifications for survival in our belief that we are not persuasible. Descriptors: Attitude Change, Communication (Thought Transfer), Cultural Influences, Futures (of Society)

Hackman, Judith; And Others (1972). Survey of the Mass Media: Curriculum Guide for Stow Senior High School 1971-1972. An outline guide for a survey of major mass media–newspapers, magazines, radio, television, movies, books, and advertising–is presented. The course intends to help students develop critical judgement of the media by improving viewing, reading, and listening skills. The objectives include: (1) presentation of the characteristics of each major medium, (2) demonstration of the factors shaping the offerings of each medium, (3) examination of the self-regulatory guides of each medium to determine if these are sufficient to insure quality and service, (4) identification of devices used by any or all of these media to measure or to mold public opinion, and (5) formation of criteria to judge what one receives through all media. The outline includes assignments, study projects, and bibliographies for each medium, a comprehensive bibliography for all of the media surveyed, and a list of additional suggested projects. Descriptors: Critical Reading, Cultural Awareness, Curriculum Guides, Journalism

Flory, Joyce (1976). Strategies for Teaching Advertising: A Summary. This paper offers techniques and strategies which high school and college teachers of speech communication can use for teaching units and/or courses in advertising. One such technique is role playing, which can involve the corporate chairperson, the executive coordinator, and chairpersons for magazine advertising, outdoor advertising, broadcast advertising, and direct mail. The paper also explores facets of advertising which instructors should cover, such as the application of principles of organization communication, technical aspects of advertising, evaluation of specific techniques, audiences, legal perspectives, the development of criteria for evaluation of advertising, and the formulation of recommendations for change. A bibliography of resources on the technical aspects of advertising is included. Descriptors: Advertising, Business Communication, Higher Education, Information Dissemination

New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development. (1970). American Civilization in Historic Perspective, Part I. A Guide for Teaching Social Studies, Grade 11. This teaching guide offers illustrative and reference materials that are both narrative and graphic on the three topics of Mass Media, Conflicting Ideologies, and Social Control. The objective is to furnish primary materials on these topics not easily available to teachers. Emphasis is on organizing the selections as short cases or studies. Related understandings are grouped together to emphasize this approach. The inductive method encourages students to examine the presentations objectively, analyze and interpret them in terms of the medium, and consider the historic development of the issues. Section 1, Mass Media, presents a study of the Power of the Press: A Case Study of the Tweed Ring, and the Mass Media Today, including the Agnew address and related material on network censorship. In section 2, Conflicting Ideologies, variations in the role and attitude of the pacifist in different periods of U.S. history and conflicting views regarding the influence of Communism in American life are given. The purpose of section 3, Social Control, is to develop some understanding of the limitations which must be observed, even in time of crisis, when hysteria urges the forgetting of those values of individual rights and human dignity which are implicit in democracy. The Japanese-Americans in World War II are examined. Descriptors: Case Studies, Communism, Grade 11, Historiography

Brodsky, Harold (1994). Collecting Maps That Lie, Journal of Geography. Asserts that all maps lie in two ways: (1) by concealing part of the whole truth or (2) by falsifying some part of the truth. Discusses how this topic can be used in geography instruction. Includes a description of class assignments and figures illustrating how maps and written directions include inaccuracies and deliberate lies. Descriptors: Cartography, Classroom Techniques, Deception, Educational Strategies

Pickett, Calder M. (1976). Firebrands of the Revolution. Prepared as commentary for a slide/tape presentation, this document briefly examines the role of the press in the American Revolution. It discusses propagandist activities led by such agitators as Samuel Adams, newspaper reports of the day that dealt with events of the revolution, and the work of incendiary writers and journalists, including Philip Freneau and Thomas Paine. The document lists the slides used in the presentation and indicates which songs were recorded for use at specified points in the commentary. Descriptors: Audiovisual Aids, Authors, Journalism, Music

Holliday, Albert E. (1983). Mobilizing the Media: Practical Ways to Work Effectively with Newspapers, Radio, and Television Stations, Journal of Educational Communication. Because of an increasing proportion of nonparents in communities, schools must learn to use newspapers, radio, and television to build community support for education. A hypothetical case shows how education officials can mount an aggressive communication program using staff volunteers to work with the public media. Descriptors: Advertising, Elementary Secondary Education, Information Dissemination, Institutional Advancement

Zimbardo, Philip; Ebbesen, Ebbe B. (1970). Influencing Attitudes and Changing Behavior: A Basic Introduction to Relevant Methodology, Theory, and Applications. Revised Edition. In this introductory text to the field of attitude change, the emphasis is on one of the end products of research in social psychology–manipulation and control of attitudes and related behaviors. The text first defines the concept of attitude, then identifies ideas from the areas of history, literature, law, religion, and the social sciences that explore concepts of attitude change. It examines the experiment as a source of general information and reviews some representative studies. A critical analysis of the conceptualization, methodology, and interpretation of attitude change research is given, along with an examination of the role of theory in explaining the results of experiments. In considering practical applications of principles of attitude and behavior change, the text details such real life examples as psychological warfare, prejudice, police interrogation, consumer motivation, and supersalesmanship. Five appended essays deal with: techniques of attitude measurement, experiment as a source of information, sources of invalidity in experimental designs, an efficient method for outlining experiments, and the student as an agent of political and social reform. Descriptors: Attitude Change, Behavior Change, Behavior Theories, Behavioral Science Research

Monroe, Alan D. (1975). Public Opinion in America. The purposes of this book are to summarize and analyze the nature of public opinion in contemporary America and to examine the implications of that nature for the possibility of a functioning democracy. Material in the four sections covers the following topics: "The Study of Public Opinion: Political Theory and Methodology"–opinions and democratic theory, and the measurement of public opinion; "Opinion Formation: Micro-Politics"–the psychology of opinions, political socialization, the sociology of public opinion, political culture, opinion manipulation, and individual opinion formation; "Public Opinion in Contemporary America: Macro-Politics"–belief systems of the American public, recent presidential elections and their implications, public opinion and Vietnam, ideology and the social issue, and the dynamics of public opinion; and "Public Opinion and Public Policy: Linkage Politics"–elections, political parties, and public officials. An index concludes the book. Descriptors: American Culture, Elections, Political Attitudes, Political Influences

Wilhoit, G. Cleveland; Weaver, David H. (1978). U.S. Senatorial News Coverage from 1953 to 1975: A Study of the 83rd, 89th, 91st and 93rd Congresses. Senators of the Eighty-third Congress were studied to ascertain what factors were most highly correlated with press coverage for each individual senator. This information was then correlated with an earlier study of the Eighty-ninth, Ninety-first, and Ninety-third Congresses to see what differences might exist which could indicate the development of a "new breed" of publicity-minded senators commanding a power base through national constituencies created by media coverage. Few differences were found between the earlier study of the more recent Congresses and the study of the Eighty-third Congress. While senators with a high institutional opportunity (a combination of seniority, prestigious committee leadership assignments, and state size) have an advantage over less powerful colleagues which shows up more in the Eighty-third Congress than in the later ones, nevertheless, senate activity (measured by number of Congressional Record entries and bills and resolutions sponsored) is a more powerful predictor of press coverage than institutional opportunity in all four Congresses. Senators with power bases created in part by media coverage are not a recent phenomenon and are at least as evident in the Eighty-third Congress as in the Ninety-third Congress.   [More]  Descriptors: Legislators, Media Research, News Media, News Reporting

Hager, David R. (1973). "Virginia and the President Need Him" vs. "Your Own Senator…His Own Man:" A Case Study of the Use of Media as a Campaign Instrument. The purpose of this paper is to examine the role played by the media in the 1972 U.S. Senate election in Virginia during the Scott and Spong campaigns. Its primary interest is the use of television, particularly the intense blitz by the Scott organization, which is viewed as a significant variable in the Scott victory. The case study seeks to provide insight into the uses and effects of media saturation in a state-wide election. It is accompanied by a presentation of the television materials utilized in the respective campaigns. The conclusions concerning the role of the media in the campaign are: the media were a significant variable in the outcome of the Scott-Spong election contest; the mass media, especially television, served as a catalyst that activated the potential of other campaign factors, such as the political shift in the state and the public displeasure over forced busing; the use of strategy, placement, and exposure of materials is more determinative of election success than production quality; and as a result of the campaign, the extensive use of the mass media, especially television, has become a prominent aspect of political activity in Virginia.   [More]  Descriptors: Commercial Television, Communications, Mass Media, Media Research

HAYAKAWA, S.I. (1964). LANGUAGE IN THOUGHT AND ACTION. A SEMANTIC DISCUSSION OF LANGUAGE IN GENERAL AND OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE IN PARTICULAR, THIS VOLUME IS DIVIDED INTO TWO BOOKS–"THE FUNCTIONS OF LANGUAGE" AND "LANGUAGE AND THOUGHT." BOOK 1 DISCUSSES LANGUAGE AND SURVIVAL, SYMBOLS, REPORTS, INFERENCES, JUDGMENTS, CONTEXTS, INFORMATIVE AND AFFECTIVE CONNOTATION, ART AND TENSION, AND THE "LANGUAGES" OF SOCIAL COHESION, SOCIAL CONTROL, AND AFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION. BOOK 2 IS CONCERNED WITH ABSTRACTION AND DEFINITION, CLASSIFICATION, POETRY, ADVERTISING, CULTURAL LAG, AND TWO-VALUED, MULTI-VALUED, AND EXTENSIONAL ORIENTATIONS TOWARD LANGUAGE MEANING. CHAPTERS CONCLUDE WITH "APPLICATIONS" DESIGNED TO FURTHER CLARIFY THE AUTHOR'S POINT OF VIEW AND TO CHECK THE VALIDITY OF IT IN SPECIFIC EXERCISES AND INVESTIGATIONS. A SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY OF BOOKS ON LANGUAGE IS APPENDED. THIS VOLUME IS PUBLISHED BY HARCOURT, BRACE, AND WORLD, INC., NEW YORK, $5.50 (PAPERBACK, $3.95). Descriptors: Advertising, Biological Influences, Classification, Critical Thinking

Smyth, John C. (1997). Education, Communication and Language, Environmentalist. Discusses ways in which educators and environmental conservation organizations may be at odds over environmental education. Concludes that the quality of communication should be judged on the effectiveness and accuracy with which messages pass between participants and not on its capacity to herd people along a particular path. Descriptors: Agenda Setting, Bias, Communication (Thought Transfer), Conservation (Environment)

JENKINSON, EDWARD B., ED. (1965). TEACHER'S GUIDE TO HIGH SCHOOL JOURNALISM. IN AN EFFORT TO TRAIN HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS TO BECOME INTELLIGENT READERS, LISTENERS, AND VIEWERS OF MASS MEDIA, THE INDIANA STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION PUBLISHED A GUIDE FOR TEACHERS OF JOURNALISM. PART I ESTABLISHES GUIDELINES FOR A FIRST SEMESTER COURSE IN JOURNALISM AND CONTAINS CHAPTERS ON (1) EXPLORING MASS MEDIA, A DISCUSSION OF THE TYPES OF MEDIA, THE MANY ASPECTS OF FREEDOM OF THE PRESS, AND ADVERTISING AND ITS PLACE WITHIN MASS MEDIA, (2) NEWSWRITING, (3) THE FEATURE STORY, (4) EDITORIALS AND OTHER OPINION MATTER, (5) ADVERTISING IN SCHOOL PUBLICATIONS, AND (6) COPYREADING, HEADLINE WRITING, AND PROOFREADING. CHAPTERS INCLUDE BIBLIOGRAPHIES FOR TEACHERS AND SUGGESTIONS FOR RELATED STUDENT ACTIVITIES AND PROJECTS. PART II, A HANDBOOK FOR ADVISORS OF SCHOOL PUBLICATIONS, CONTAINS SECTIONS ON (1) PRODUCING THE HIGH SCHOOL NEWSPAPER, (2) PRODUCING THE MIMEOGRAPHED NEWSPAPER, (3) PRODUCING THE YEARBOOK, (4) FINANCING SCHOOL PUBLICATIONS, (5) OPERATING THE SCHOOL NEWS BUREAU, AND (6) OPPORTUNITIES IN THE MASS MEDIA. THIS GUIDE IS AVAILABLE FROM NCTE, 508 SOUTH SIXTH ST., CHAMPAIGN, ILL. 61820 (ORDER NO. 48503, $1.50), AND THE INDIANA HIGH SCHOOL PRESS ASSN., FRANKLIN COLLEGE, FRANKLIN, IND. 46131 ($2.00). Descriptors: Curriculum Guides, English Instruction, High School Students, Journalism

Owens, Walton H. (1979). Expanding Pedagogical Boundaries in Political Science: Teaching the Practical Art of Television Electioneering, Teaching Political Science. Describes a project preparing students to make political advertisements for television, including details for necessary hardware, script preparation, formatting, time management, and coordination with the television studio. Includes description of each role and broadcasting jargon. Descriptors: Audiovisual Communications, Citizenship, Higher Education, Political Science

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