Bibliography: Propaganda (page 63 of 66)

This bibliography is reformatted and customized for the Alternative Facts website. Some of the authors featured on this page include Michael J. Emme, Washington Department of Education, F.W. JESSUP, Jack M. McLeod, Mary Ellen Barnes, Magnus O. Bassey, Frank Glew, ELLEN PROPPER MICKIEWICZ, Mark F. Goldberg, and Corono Corono-Norco Unified School District.

MICKIEWICZ, ELLEN PROPPER (1967). SOVIET POLITICAL SCHOOLS, THE COMMUNIST PARTY ADULT INSTRUCTION SYSTEM. A STUDY WAS MADE OF SOVIET ADULT POLITICAL EDUCATION MAINLY AS IT APPLIES TO RUSSIAN URBAN AREAS, WHERE THE SYSTEM IS MOST HIGHLY DEVELOPED. THIS SYSTEM, AN AGENCY FOR TRANSMITTING POLITICAL DOCTRINE, FORMS A PART OF THE VAST NETWORK OF FORMAL POLITICAL COMMUNICATION, WHICH INCLUDES THE MASS MEDIA, AGITATION, AND COMMUNIST PARTY LEADERSHIP TRAINING SCHOOLS. UNDER KHRUSCHEV, THE SYSTEM BECAME THE MOST IMPORTANT COMPONENT OF POLITICAL ACTIVITY. AN EXAMINATION OF THE HIERARCHY OF POLITICAL SCHOOLS, CIRCLES, AND THE EVENING UNIVERSITY OF MARXISM-LENINISM PROVIDES INSIGHT INTO THE ORGANIZATION, ADMINISTRATION, AND CHARACTER OF THE SYSTEM. IT IS CONCLUDED THAT, DESPITE FAULTS IN SUCH AREAS AS TEACHER AND STUDENT RECRUITMENT, INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS, AND SUPERVISORY AND TEACHING METHODS, ADULT POLITICAL INSTRUCTION WILL REMAIN A MAJOR FACTOR IN SOVIET POLITICAL COMMUNICATION. A SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY IS INCLUDED. THIS DOCUMENT IS AVAILABLE FROM THE YALE UNIVERSITY PRESS, 149 YORK STREET, NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT O6511. 196 PAGES. Descriptors: Adult Education, Adult Educators, Adult Programs, Bibliographies

Marshall, Max L. (1969). The 'Right-to-Read' Controversy. Freedom of Information Center Report No. 199. The growing amount of activity by pressure groups, as well as professional statements like those of the American Library Association and the American Association of Library Teachers, reflect an increased concern with legal, quasi-legal or extra-legal censorship. The National Organization for Decent Literature, a Catholic-Church sponsored censorship group, publishes an evaluation of materials, and while they do not intend their lists for boycott or coercion, they admit that that has occurred. The activities of Citizens for Decent Literature (now the most active and successful of the "decency movement" groups) parallel those of the New Jersey Committee for the Right to Read and the National Council for Freedom to Read. Each of these groups has (1) attempted to influence the public through speakers and newsletters, (2) provided some legal assistance, and (3) surveyed psychiatrists as to the effects of pornography, particularly on the young. Of these two forces, the activities of the "decency movement" have enjoyed broader, more vocal public support. (Examples of court decisions and local news concerning censorship are cited throughout the report.)   [More]  Descriptors: Academic Freedom, Censorship, Child Development, Civil Liberties

McLeod, Jack M.; And Others (1987). Communication and Energy Conservation, Journal of Environmental Education. Reports on the results of a survey of homeowners in two Wisconsin communities which examined the relationship of media use to a set of cognitive, attitudinal, and behavioral components of energy conservation. Suggests that conservation campaigns take into account communication patterns and energy use of specific groups of consumers. Descriptors: Communications, Energy Conservation, Energy Education, Environmental Education

Coulby, David (1997). European Curricula, Xenophobia and Warfare, Comparative Education. Examines school and university curricula in Europe and the extent of their influence on xenophobia. Considers the pluralistic nature of the European population. Discusses the role of curriculum selection and language policy in state efforts to promote nationalism. Assesses the role of curricular systems in the actual encouragement of warfare, using Serbia as an example. Contains 33 references. Descriptors: Educational Policy, Elementary Secondary Education, Ethnocentrism, Foreign Countries

Glew, Frank (1998). From Both Sides, Pathways: The Ontario Journal of Outdoor Education. Ontario Agri-Food Education's curriculum unit, "From Both Sides," applies a cooperative-learning method of conflict resolution to environmental issues. Two groups of students are assigned polar views on an issue such as pesticide use. Five steps involve preparing and presenting a position, refuting opposing positions, reversing perspectives, and creating synthesis. Related teacher workshops and resources are listed. Descriptors: Conflict Resolution, Controversial Issues (Course Content), Cooperative Learning, Educational Resources

Barnes, Mary Ellen; And Others (1992). Selling Addiction: A Workshop Kit on Tobacco and Alcohol Advertising. A Media Literacy Workshop Kit. This kit consists of: (1) a leader's guide; (2) an 18-minute videotape containing three 6-minute discussion starter segments analyzing typical commercials and advertising techniques; (3) a special issue of "Media Values" magazine on the theme "Fatal Attraction: The Selling of Addiction"; (4) an 8-page booklet "Awareness to Action: Media Literacy for the '90s"; (5) a 30-minute video "Consumer Seduction: From Romance to Reality." This packet is designed for use in awareness workshops of how advertising encourages the use and abuse of the two legal drugs, alcohol and tobacco. Constructed for use in two 2-hour sessions, in two consecutive weeks, the activities allow time for ideas from the workshop to be "tried out" at home. In the workshop process, participants identify and develop strategies for breaking the media/addiction link. The two sessions include: (1) "How They Get You Hooked"; and (2) "How They Keep You Hooked." Readings, handouts and follow-up suggestions are included in the packet. Descriptors: Advertising, Alcohol Education, Alcoholism, Content Analysis

Webb, Nick (1997). Legotalk in the Research Park. Commentary, Studies in Art Education. Utilizes Uwe Poerksen's concept of "plastic words" to examine and criticize the preeminence given to research in art education. "Plastic words" refers to vague technical jargon that suggests meaning without actually providing it (e.g., development, process, goal-setting). Argues that this usage inherently corrupts and diverts any productive activity. Descriptors: Art Education, Educational Quality, Educational Trends, Higher Education

Goldberg, Mark F.; And Others (1967). Listening to Understand and Speaking to be Understood: Curriculum Units For The Average Non-College Bound Ninth or Tenth Year Student. The two teaching units in this document present listening and speaking as dynamic skills and emphasize learning through discovery and induction. "Listening to Understand" encourages the student to participate primarily as a member of a group rather than as an individual. Classroom exercises are listed for teaching students efficient listening, the nature of sound, the effect of environmental contexts on sound, the function of word order, changes in language meaning, the techniques used in propoganda and commercials, and the functions of music. "Speaking to be Understood" encourages the student to participate as an individual and offers more opportunity for inferential learning. Methods of teaching basic communication, language learning and dialect, semantics, voice and speech improvement, and oral literature are presented.   [More]  Descriptors: Communication Skills, Communication (Thought Transfer), English Instruction, Language Skills

Randolph-Robinson, Brenda (1984). The Depiction of South Africa in U.S. Materials for Children, Interracial Books for Children Bulletin. The three articles in this issue provide (1) an examination of 19 current textbooks revealing most have misleading, inaccurate, or racist contents; (2) results of a study reviewing more than 40 children's books and finding that even the newest are generally inadequate, and older titles still in circulation are blatantly biased; and (3) a description and list of recommended audio-visual materials. The first and second of these articles were written by Brenda Randolph-Robinson; the third was written by Marylee Crofts. Also provided are suggestions concerning a variety of resources with which educators can disseminate accurate information about South Africa. Descriptors: Audiovisual Aids, Blacks, Book Reviews, Childrens Literature

Bassey, Magnus O. (1991). Missionary Rivalry and Educational Expansion in Southern Nigeria, 1885-1932, Journal of Negro Education. Argues that, although education was an important objective of the missions in Africa, the rapid expansion of education in southern Nigeria between 1885 and 1932 was actually the accidental outcome of missionary and Catholic Church rivalry, rather than the result of an altruistic policy to expand educational opportunities for Africans. Descriptors: Access to Education, African History, Black Education, Catholic Educators

Maxwell, Rhoda, Ed. (1982). Television and the Teaching of English. Recognizing that students spend more time before the television set than in school, this monograph evaluates television as a potential resource in the teaching of English. The nine articles in the collection (1) discuss the effect of massive television viewing on children in and out of the classroom; (2) examine the students' need to apply critical thinking skills to their television viewing; (3) describe activities and materials designed to develop these cognitive skills in students at all levels; and (4) list various books and organizations offering further information on television and the schools. The articles suggest that rather than being a liability, television, if intelligently used, can serve as a highly motivating tool in teaching both critical thinking skills and literature. Descriptors: Audiences, Childrens Television, Commercial Television, Critical Thinking

COLES, E.K. TOWNSEND; JESSUP, F.W. (1967). INTERNATIONAL AND INTER-RACIAL UNDERSTANDING, THE CONTRIBUTION OF ADULT EDUCATION. THE REQUISITE LEVEL OF INTERNATIONAL AND INTERRACIAL UNDERSTANDING WILL NOT BE ACHIEVED WITHOUT A GREAT EXPANSION OF ADULT EDUCATION. EDUCATION FOR INTERNATIONAL AND RACIAL UNDERSTANDING MAY SEEK TO COMMUNICATE RELEVANT KNOWLEDGE, TO INCULCATE WHOLESOME ATTITUDES, AND TO PROVIDE PERTINENT EXPERIENCE. INTERNATIONAL UNDERSTANDING MAY BE PROMOTED BY (1) DIRECT TEACHING OF SUCH SUBJECTS AS FOREIGN LANGUAGES, ANTHROPOLOGY, GEOGRAPHY, AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS, (2) GROUP AND SOCIAL ACTIVITIES, SUCH AS STUDY TOURS, RESIDENTIAL COURSES, AND EXCHANGE PROGRAMS, (3) SUCH INFORMATIONAL SOURCES AS LIBRARIES, NEWSPAPERS, MUSEUMS, AND RADIO AND TELEVISION, AND (4) ACTIVITIES OF INSTITUTIONS AND ORGANIZATIONS WHICH SEEK TO INFLUENCE ATTITUDES AND BEHAVIOR, SUCH AS THE UNITED NATIONS ASSOCIATION, THE ENGLISH-SPEAKING UNION, AND CHRISTIAN CHURCHES. RACE RELATIONS, AS A FIELD OF STUDY, SHOULD RECEIVE MORE SPECIALIST CONSIDERATION AND SHOULD BE MORE WIDELY INTRODUCED INTO ADULT CLASSES. THE ADULT EDUCATOR MAY PROVIDE ACADEMIC STUDY OF THE SUBJECT, OR EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCES WHICH HELP INDIVIDUALS TO LIVE IN HARMONY IN A "RACIALLY" MIXED SOCIETY. (APPENDIXES INCLUDE EXAMPLES OF SIX COURSES AND COMMUNITY ACTION PROGRAMS.) THIS DOCUMENT IS AVAILABLE FROM THE NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ADULT EDUCATION, 35 QUEEN ANNE STREET, LONDON W.1, ENGLAND. Descriptors: Adult Education, Attitude Change, Educational Methods, Educational Resources

Emme, Michael J., Ed.; And Others (1994). Journal of Social Theory in Art Education, 1994, Journal of Social Theory in Art Education. Articles in this journal examine the way art and art education affect the individual and the formation of culture. This volume includes: (1) "The Deep Creek School: Technology, Ecology and the Body as Pedagogical Alternatives in Art Education" (Daniel L. Collins; Charles R. Garoian); (2) "The Green Quilt: An Example of Collective Eco-Action in Art Education" (Doug Blandy; Kristin G. Congdon; Laurie Hicks; Elizabeth Hoffman; and Don Krug); (3) "An Editor's Note: Critical Theory, Art and Education" (Michael J. Emme); (4) "The Gallery" (David Amdur; Robert Bersson; Gene Cooper; Drent Howenstein; Laurie Lundquist; Meryl Meisler; Juanita Miller; Gretchen Riemer; Kai Staats); (5) "Valuing Difference: Luce Irigaray and Feminist Pedagogy" (Yvonne Gaudelius); (6) "Behind, the Road is Blocked: Art Education and Nostalgia" (Paul Duncum); (7) "The Committee on Public Information and the Mobilization of Public Opinion in the United States During World War I: The Effects on Education and Artists" (Clayton Funk); (8) "Art, Education, Work, and Leisure: Tangles in the Lifelong Learning Network" (Lara M. Lackey); (9) "'Truth' That Sells: Broadcast News Media in Video Art and Art Education" (Mary Wyrick). Book reviews look at works by authors: Terry Barrett (1994), "Criticizing Art: Understanding the Contemporary" (John H. White, Jr.); Leslie Weisman (1992), "Discrimination by Design: A Feminist Critique of the Man-Made Environment" (Joanne K. Guilfoil); and Robert Hughes (1993), "Culture of Complaint: The Fraying of America" (Patricia Amburgy). Descriptors: Aesthetic Values, Art, Art Education, Artists

Corono-Norco Unified School District, Corono, CA. (1984). Communication Skills 8 (Non-Leveled Semester Class for All Eighth Graders). Persuasion Unit. THE FOLLOWING IS THE FULL TEXT OF THIS DOCUMENT: Prior to the persuasion unit, students have spent several weeks in class utilizing library research techniques, public speaking skills, and their writing processes. The unit has been devised to give students practical experience using critical thinking and decision-making skills, persuasive language, writing and speaking abilities, and critiquing techniques. Students first brainstorm as a class for ideas on possible issues with which they are concerned (e.g., national security, abortion, drug abuse), each choosing five possible topics for their own research. One day in the library helps students peruse available materials for their possible issues. We then discuss how to state, defend, and argue an opinion fairly. Returning to the library, they limit their topics to one, decide which side of the issue they will take, and find at least two sources of information. After taking notes, they make a skeletal outline, slotting in facts where appropriate. The students write rough drafts of their persuasive papers after deciding on a specific audience (e.g., the President or an anti-abortion group). I read papers anonymously in class and students critique the form, arguments, and persuasiveness of each other's papers. Students rewrite their papers for a grade; they are later given an option to rewrite their papers for a higher grade. Finally, the class role-plays the specified audiences while students read their papers as speeches. After this experience, students are given a chance to use "unfair" persuasive arguments (bandwagon, testimonial, name-calling, card stacking, and glittering generality)–(see "Scholastic Voice," November 12, 1982, page 17)–by writing and performing commercials singly, in pairs, or in trios. In class, students brainstorm for products' names, write out dialogues, prepare props, and practice their commercials. Then commercials are videotaped and played back to the class while students critique commercials verbally and in writing, commenting on what students have done effectively and how commercials could be even better. [This document was selected by the Association of California School Aministrators (ACSA) Task Force on Public Confidence as descriptive of a promising practice or exemplary project worthy of highlighting for the California educational community.] Descriptors: Advertising, Communication Skills, Critical Thinking, Decision Making Skills

Department of Education, Washington, DC. (1988). America's Schools: Everybody's Business. A Report to the President. This brief pamphlet describes and promotes educational partnerships that have been established over the past 5 years between schools and the private sector. The sponsoring partners described include banks, fast food restaurants, insurance companies, bakeries, law firms, dry cleaners, police departments, professional basketball teams, publishing companies, automobile manufacturers, civic and service clubs, and wealthy private individuals.   [More]  Descriptors: Advertising, Career Education, Cooperative Programs, Corporate Education

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