Bibliography: Propaganda (page 64 of 66)

This bibliography is reformatted and customized for the Alternative Facts website. Some of the authors featured on this page include Beatrice Beach Szekely, Anne Messerly Cooper, Pat Arneson, GERD KORMAN, Roderic Gorney, Thomas V. Dickson, Lisa Pine, Gary Steele, Rose Nash, and Marc Depaepe.

KORMAN, GERD (1967). INDUSTRIALIZATION, IMMIGRANTS, AND AMERICANIZERS, THE VIEW FROM MILWAUKEE, 1866-1921. DURING THE LATE NINETEENTH CENTURY, ATTEMPTS WERE MADE IN MILWAUKEE AND ELSEWHERE IN THE NATION TO IMPROVE RELATIONS BETWEEN INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYERS AND THEIR IMMIGRANT WORKERS. THESE ATTEMPTS CONSISTED LARGELY OF COMPANY-SPONSORED RECREATIONAL AND WELFARE ACTIVITIES MARKED BY INFORMALITY AND PATERNALISM. AFTER 1900, HOWEVER, CAME MORE SYSTEMATIC SAFETY, HEALTH, AND WELFARE PROGRAMS BY SUCH COMPANIES AS ILLINOIS STEEL, ALLIS-CHALMERS, AND INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER. METHODS AND MATERIALS FOR SAFETY AND HEALTH EDUCATION WERE OFTEN DESIGNED TO COPE WITH THE MANY LANGUAGES AND THE ALLEGED CULTURAL AND MENTAL LIMITATIONS OF SEMISKILLED AND UNSKILLED WORKERS FROM EASTERN AND SOUTHERN EUROPE. IN ADDITION, LABOR MILITANCY, INDUSTRIAL CHANGE, AND THE OUTBREAK OF WORLD WAR I SPURRED THE CREATION OF ENGLISH CLASSES AND INTENSIVE AMERICANIZATION CAMPAIGNS IN INDUSTRY, ESPECIALLY IN THE UNITED STATES STEEL COMPANY AND THE FORD MOTOR COMPANY. (SOCIOECONOMIC AND OCCUPATIONAL PATTERNS AND CONDITIONS AMONG VARIOUS MILWAUKEE ETHNIC GROUPS DURING THE DECADES OF HEAVIEST IMMIGRATION ARE ALSO DOCUMENTED.) THE DOCUMENT INCLUDES A SUBJECT INDEX, AN EXTENSIVE BIBLIOGRAPHY, AND IS AVAILABLE FROM THE STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF WISCONSIN, MADISON. Descriptors: Citizenship, Educational Objectives, Employer Employee Relationship, Employment Patterns

Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Center for Curriculum Development in English. (1968). Unit 1204: The Evaluation of Persuasive Discourse. This unit for grade 12 is intended to provide an introduction to the criticism of persuasive discourse. After a brief discussion of the definition of criticism, the unit proceeds to the establishment of standards for evaluating persuasive discourse, standards involving Kenneth Burke's pentad: act, scene, agent, agency, and purpose. The unit then deals with three categories of discourse which can be evaluated–the single speech or article, the persuasive discourse of a person, and the persuasive discourse of a movement. To aid in the process of criticism itself, a format of questions is set up to require the students to place the speech in a meaningful context, to analyze the speech itself, and to assess the effects of the speech. Finally, this format is used in a sample analysis of Douglas MacArthur's "Address to Congress." Procedural notes for the teacher, lectures, and discussion questions are included.   [More]  Descriptors: Content Analysis, Critical Thinking, Curriculum Guides, English Curriculum

Gorney, Roderic; Steele, Gary (1976). The Mass Media of Entertainment and Human Survival. Urgently needed for human survival is a means of influencing large numbers of people to put into rapid action measures which could neutralize such menances as pollution, overpopulation, and violence. Though the cumulative effect of the mass media is not fully established, media entertainment may be the most influential institution in our society. To avoid the spector of censorship, the media would be best controlled through a systematic and open discussion of the social impact of media presentations conducted by media experts and by interested citizens. This action would result in full, advance disclosure of assumptions, attitudes, and values built into mass entertainment. Descriptors: Attitude Change, Behavior Change, Behavior Development, Broadcast Industry

Nash, Rose (1971). The Place of the English Language in the U.S.S.R. In comparing the teaching of English in the Soviet Union and in Puerto Rico, the author notes that English language instruction in the Soviet Union is characterized by well-trained teachers, good facilities, and an emphasis on practical phonetics, although writing skills are not up to contemporary standards. People are avid and enthusiastic students, but the program suffers from lack of contact with an English-speaking country. In Puerto Rico there is contact with an English-speaking country, but a lack of well-trained teachers and good facilities exists. There is also a difference in attitude toward learning English. The Soviet citizen studies English to enrich his life and is not afraid that he will lose his Russian culture. In Puerto Rico many students regard the study of English as a necessary evil that will soon be done away with, making it a waste of time.   [More]  Descriptors: Cultural Differences, Culture Conflict, Culture Contact, English (Second Language)

Cooper, Anne Messerly (1981). Affect of Arab News: Post-treaty Portrayal of Egypt and Israel in the Mass Media of Three Arab Countries. A study of 4,692 news stories from Egyptian, Algerian, and Tunisian electronic and print news media was conducted to see how state-controlled media reflected government policy changes following the Egyptian-Israeli peace treaty and the subsequent diplomatic break between Egypt and Arab League nations. The study found that the three controlled press systems used more positive and negative affect when referring to Israel and Egypt than did the noncontrolled systems, which exhibited largely neutral or mixed affect. The patterns of bias that emerged from the study suggested that government-controlled Arab media do not slavishly follow government policy, and that the media of individual Arab countries exhibit striking differences. For example, Tunisian news treatment was straightforward, presenting the majority of stories without bias, Algerian treatment colored the majority of references to Israel and Egypt, and Egypt's penchant for bias fell somewhere in between. Finally, all Arab media exhibited certain patterns of affect: Arab-to-Arab, Arab-to-Israel, and Arab-to-other. The negative affect with which Arab media portrayed Israel seemed intransigent and thorough-going.   [More]  Descriptors: Arabs, Attitude Change, Bias, Change Agents

Curtis, Ron (1975). Media Competency. The need to teach media competency in the schools in a systematic way has been largely unrecognized. The Media Now course of study provides an example of the type of instruction needed to teach the knowledge and skills necessary for informed media consumption and skilled media production. The course, which has been thoroughly tested and validated in the classroom, is built around performance objectives, learning by doing, and individualized instruction, and concentrates on the film, radio, and television media.   [More]  Descriptors: Change Strategies, Communications, Educational Change, Educational Innovation

Sprague, Gregory A. (1978). "Spiegeldorf": Nazi Appeals in Weimar Germany. The paper discusses rationales for simulation gaming and describes "Spiegeldorf," a socio-historical game which simulates socioeconomic conditions in early 1930 Germany and Nazi party tactics used to gain mass support. Objectives are to identify characteristic Nazi tactics and points of political ideology, describe German social classes and their fears and frustrations, analyze ways Nazism appealed to many Germans, and increase student interest in the subject and enjoyment in playing the game. Each student plays the role of a Nazi party organizer, whose goal is to convert as many people as possible. Play proceeds through choosing one of five tactics and receiving outcome cards and conversion points. With the appointment of Hitler as Chancellor of Germany, each student adds up the number of converts and ascertains the final outcome. Time allotment is 90 minutes. Materials include a game board, information sheets, conversion checklists, outcome, event, and influence cards, and a debriefing guide. Discussion analyzes the cause-and-effect relationships affecting the payoff through exploration of student feelings, explanation of strategies, and examination of concepts and principles. Evaluation criteria were historical accuracy, positive student attitudes, and an increase in student knowledge. Use of subject authorities ensured accuracy, while attitudes and knowledge were measured through observation, a questionnaire, and a posttest. Sample game materials and questionnaire results are appended. Descriptors: Class Activities, Educational Games, Educational Objectives, European History

Pine, Lisa (1996). The Dissemination of Nazi Ideology and Family Values through School Textbooks, History of Education. Examines and analyzes a number of textbooks used during the National Socialist regime in Germany. In accordance with a centralized, totalitarian effort the textbooks overwhelmingly represented Nazi ideology especially in their focus on eugenics, family roles, and the importance of the community. Descriptors: Family (Sociological Unit), Family Life, Fascism, Foreign Countries

Arneson, Pat (1987). The Discourse of Presidents Ronald Reagan and Daniel Ortega: Peace in Nicaragua without Concession. Seeking to understand American and Nicaraguan perspectives of the Nicaraguan revolution, a study examined the rhetorical strategies used by Presidents Reagan and Ortega in their speeches. Ten public addresses made by each president in 1985-1986, pertaining to funding for Nicaraguan counterrevolutionary forces, were charted and examined for prevalent themes. The themes were then grouped together by the ideas represented, and the groups were clustered to represent a broader topic of consideration. A discourse analysis based on Kenneth Burke's ideas on myth criticism investigated the mythic structure of each leader's rhetoric. In addition, an agon analysis of the rhetorical texts examined the philosophical perspectives of the two presidents. Analyses indicated that President Ortega's discourse featured the pentadic element "purpose," which corresponds to the philosophical term of mysticism, while President Reagan's discourse featured the pentadic element "agency" which corresponds to pragmatism. These philosophical perspectives are components of each other and as such serve to define each other. Just as a means is implicit in an end for Daniel Ortega's mysticism, purpose is implicit in agency for Ronald Reagan's pragmatism. Findings suggest that the political drama of international policy rhetoric is a viable and necessary area for future study. (Forty notes are attached.)   [More]  Descriptors: Communication Research, Comparative Analysis, Conflict Resolution, Cultural Context

Depaepe, Marc (1997). Differences and Similarities in the Development of Educational Psychology in Germany and the United States before 1945, Paedagogica Historica. Attributes the divergence between U.S. and German approaches to educational psychology prior to World War II to the German emphasis on "Gestaltpsychologie." This approach focused on hermeneutics and philosophy rather than behaviorism. The emphasis on a total, interconnected philosophical approach was later corrupted by the Nazis into eugenics. Descriptors: Behaviorism, Comparative Education, Cross Cultural Studies, Cultural Context

Wiley, Liz (1979). The Pause–That Sells. Capsule I, II, and III. Teacher's Guide [and] Student Materials. This document provides teaching guidelines, objectives, and student activities for a three-part television advertising unit intended for use in a fourth grade consumer economics program. Major objectives of the unit are to help students look critically at television commercials. Each part of the unit requires from four to six hours of classroom time. Capsules may be used independently. The first part focuses on the use of adjectives and slogans by advertisers. Activities involve students in analyzing television and magazine ads, creating original commercials, applying television advertising words and slogans to everyday situations, creating collages from magazine advertisements, and filling in worksheets. The teacher's guide presents objectives, worksheets, activity directions, tests, answer keys, and materials lists. The second part of the unit introduces seven advertising approaches (basic ad, concern for public good, appeal to senses, expert advice, youth appeal, humor, and advice from a famous person) and offers activities which encourage students to identify approaches of a wide variety of television commercials and magazine advertisements. The thlrd part of the unit helps students make wise consumer decisions. Activities involve students in creating original commercials and in analyzing the slogan and adjective content of shampoo advertisements. Descriptors: Advertising, Consumer Education, Economics Education, Elementary Education

Dickson, Thomas V. (1988). The Role of the Cuban Press in International Political Communication: "Granma Weekly Review" and Castro's U.S. Policy. This paper reviews political symbols aimed at the United States found in "Granma Weekly Review" and in Fidel Castro's speeches to see if they have changed in a predicted manner over an 18-year period and whether changes in symbol content of "Granma" and Castro's speeches correspond. The paper first explains the functions of the Cuban media, and then recounts the history and status of U.S.-Cuban relations. Next, the paper examines Castro's attitude toward the United States. The paper then analyzes the 100 most-used symbols referring to the United States in "Granma" and finds similar symbol usage in Castro's speeches during years researchers thought to be periods of closer relations between the United States and Cuba. However, researchers found that the frequency of symbol usage in"Granma" was not similar to that found in Castro's speeches. The paper suggests that the message Castro presents in his speeches is a complex one–the message he is sending to the world community through interviews and other statements is inconsistent with the aggressive language contained in his speeches where symbol usage reflects overt Cuban policy. The paper finds that before 1974, "Granma" and Castro's speeches were similar in their use of aggressive symbols, but since then the use of aggressive symbols in "Granma" has been a better indicator of Cuban policy. Seven tables of data, nine figures of data matrix, and 67 notes are included.   [More]  Descriptors: Aggression, Content Analysis, Diplomatic History, Discourse Analysis

Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Center for Curriculum Development in English. (1968). Unit 1102: The Language of Persuasion. The purpose of this 11th-grade unit on language is to acquaint students with persuasion because it is one of the basic functions of discourse and a principal method of achieving change in a complex and democratic society. In this unit, students are provided with opportunities for recognizing, evaluating, and using persuasive discourse. The unit moves inductively from example to generalization and is organized around three categories for the analysis of persuasion–(1) the writer or speaker as persuasive agent, hero, or model, (2) the discourse itself as a tool of persuasion, with emphasis on abstraction levels and logical and psychological methods of language manipulation, and (3) the audience and the context of persuasion–the historical and geographical context, the sociological context of group values, and such psychological motives as subsistence, social approval, mastery, and habit. Materials in the unit include lectures, procedural notes, discussion questions, suggested activities, speaking-writing assignments, a list of resource materials, and a bibliography on the rudiments of persuasion. (See TE 001 328 and TE 001 329 for 10th-grade units on discourse.)   [More]  Descriptors: Audiences, Communication (Thought Transfer), Curriculum Guides, English Instruction

Mayer, Elizabeth M. (). Hammer and Compass: Introducing East Germany. An Anthology with Interpretations. This anthology introduces students of German to the life of the people of East Germany. The three-part text describes interrelated cultural and political activities which are characteristic of the republic. Part One explores basic communistic philosophy, "a new myth", particularly through commentary on Walter Ulbricht's "Universe, Earth, and Man." Part Two shows how the mythic principles are applied in: (1) literature for youth, (2) films, (3) political songs, (4) beginnings of the republic, (5) hope for a peaceful future, (6) daily work, (7) life and play, and (8) the "blues". The party stand toward West Germany is expressed in the last section. Some 55, selected, German tests are integrated into the study. [Hard copy not available due to marginal legibility of original document.]   [More]  Descriptors: Anthologies, Communism, Cultural Activities, Cultural Images

Szekely, Beatrice Beach; And Others (1978). Education and the Mass Media, Soviet Education. Discusses the strong educational role of mass media in the Soviet Union. Articles cover "Controlling Individual Development and Behavior,""The Educational Potential of the Mass Media,""Some Problems of Ideological Work and the Tasks of Psychology," plus discussion of books, television, the press, films, and the All-Union Knowledge Society.   [More]  Descriptors: Books, Communism, Educational Objectives, Essays

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