Bibliography: Selective Retention (page 3 of 3)

This annotated bibliography is compiled and customized for the Alternative Facts website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Arthur Wellesley Foshay, Irving Morrisett, Tampa. Coll. of Education. University of South Florida, WALTER W. COOK, Warren W. Shivley, ROBERT A. PIERSON, Roger E. Wilk, Lynda Lee Kaid, and Roy Gale Mikalson.

Foshay, Arthur Wellesley, Ed.; Morrisett, Irving, Ed. (1978). Beyond the Scientific: A Comprehensive View of Consciousness. Eight papers which discuss rational and nonrational modes of knowing and consciousness and their relevance to educational practice are presented. Richard Jones in "Looking Back and Forth on Consciousness" considers two modes, the rational and the metaphoric, in a discussion of dreams. Alfred Kuhn discusses random variation and selective retention (RVSR) as operations of left and right brain. The combination of the two produce rationality. Maxine Greene focuses on imaginative literature as expressing an array of modes of consciousness. Arthur Wellesly Foshay in "Intuition and Curriculum" pleads for the legitimacy of intuition and offers several examples of how the intuitive leap may be encouraged in school. Ronald Lippit and Eva Schindler-Rainman in "Knowing, Feeling, Doing" call for a fully linked person. The three elements in the title are necessary for the education of the whole person. Robert Samples makes a sharp distinction between right and left hemisphere activities and explains the dominance of the linear, logical, rationalist mode of thinking in schools chiefly through the lack of trust engendered in the classrooms. Mark Phillips describes confluent education, which recognizes and employs all forces present in classroom activity at a given time. John Haas discusses the term synectics, which refers to the unity of the metaphoric and the analytic in the creative process, and uses examples drawn from actual experience. The implications of all the papers are that there are many modes of knowing of which the rational is one and if we are to function fully we ought to make full use of all modes.   [More]  Descriptors: Books, Cognitive Processes, Concept Formation, Creativity

University of South Florida, Tampa. Coll. of Education. (1974). Case Study: Focus on Personal/Professional Preparation in Physical Education. This paper describes a program featuring integrated course sequences and continuous teaching experience that prepares teachers who can create a variety of learning environments that provide meaningful movement experiences for grades K-12,. The 2-year program sequence includes the following elements: (a) selective admissions and retention procedure, (b) individual assessment, (c) seminar and field experience/internship, and (d) human kinetics theory and application. Close articulation of program elements is assured by team teaching and open communication between faculty and students. Immediate application of theory is possible in the concurrent field experience, and frequent evaluation by all involved provides feedback for continuing refinement of the program.   [More]  Descriptors: Elementary Education, Field Experience Programs, Kinetics, Physical Education

COOK, WALTER W.; AND OTHERS (1963). A STUDY OF FACTORS OPERATIVE IN THE SELECTIVE RETENTION OF STUDENTS IN TEACHER EDUCATION, PART I. THE PURPOSE OF THIS STUDY WAS TO DISCOVER THE PERSONALITY AND EXPERIENCE FACTORS WHICH DISTINGUISH STUDENTS WHO ARE SUCCESSFUL IN PROFESSIONAL TEACHER TRAINING COURSES AND ACTUALLY ENTER TEACHING, FROM THE PERSONALITY AND EXPERIENCE FACTORS OF STUDENTS WHO DROP OUT ALONG THE WAY. INFORMATION WAS GATHERED FROM ALL STUDENTS WHO ENTER THE JUNIOR PROFESSIONAL SEQUENCE OF COURSES IN THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION. THESE STUDENTS WERE DIVIDED INTO GROUPS ACCORDING TO THEIR MAJOR AREA. THE KINDS OF DATA WHICH WERE COLLECTED INCLUDED SUCH ITEMS AS BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION, ACADEMIC RECORDS, INTERVIEW REPORTS, AND TEST MEASURES OF ABILITIES AND INTERESTS. THERE WAS IMMEDIATE FOLLOWUP OF STUDENTS WHO DROPPED OUT AT VARIOUS POINTS DURING THE TRAINING PROGRAM, AND THE FINAL ANALYSES WERE DESIGNED TO DETECT THE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THOSE WHO PERSISTED AND THOSE WHO LEFT. THE MOST SIGNIFICANT IMPLICATION FOR FURTHER RESEARCH WAS THE NEED TO CONTINUE THE PROCEDURES WHICH HAVE BEEN ESTABLISHED AND TO EXTEND DATA THAT HAVE BEEN GATHERED FOR THE INITIAL POPULATIONS OF STUDENTS. Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Dropout Rate, Educational Background, Personality Assessment

Kaid, Lynda Lee (1975). The Impact of Political Television Commercials. For decades research on mass media in political campaigns has yielded little evidence of direct, significant effects. Most survey research on elections found adequate explanations for voting decisions while excluding the impact of mass media. Although the increasing use of expensive television advertising campaigns is evidence of the confidence of candidates and their advisors, researchers have remained unconvinced, although in recent years they have begun to examine political television commercials more closely. The number of surveys has remained small, however, and fraught with methodological difficulties. Recent topics of research include: levels of voter exposure; extent of selective exposure; voter recall of information; selective perception and retention of information;"image" versus "issue" spots; the effect of length; direct impact on voting decisions; and the functions that such spots perform for voters. Recommendations for future research include the following: make further efforts to isolate the impact of particular spots; use more realistic viewing situations; measure the cumulative impact of several different spots over time; study the interaction of spots with other information sources; and study the uses voters make of the information derived from spots. Descriptors: Advertising, Broadcast Television, Communication (Thought Transfer), Information Utilization

Shivley, Warren W. (1982). Let's Reevaluate our Instruments for Selective Retention in Teacher Education, College Student Journal. Investigated the relationship between success in student teaching and 13 instruments commonly completed before student teaching and whether the measures predict success in student teaching. The data indicated the measures were ineffective. Suggested alternatives to the instruments used are proposed.   [More]  Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Academic Aptitude, Attitude Measures, Education Majors

Mikalson, Roy Gale (1964). The Impact of 1961 Legislation Relating to Probationary Teachers on Instruction and Administrative Practices in California Public Junior Colleges. In 1961, the California Legislature stiffened the legal requirements for the dismissal of probationary teachers at the end of a school year. Surveying the literature, and polling selected junior college administrators and probationary teachers, the author sought to assess the impact of this change on the quality of junior college instruction. On the positive side, he found a greater emphasis on careful selection of new faculty, revised programs of evaluation of probationary teachers, and freer feelings of probationary teachers to teach without fear of arbitrary dismissal. On the negative side, he found boards and administrators reluctant to dismiss mediocre teachers, no increase in supervisory help, and a negative effect on faculty-administrator rapport on the possibility of a hearing. The effects of the change varied with the individual college and seemed to depend on the state of faculty-administrator rapport, the ability of the college to attract and hold competent teachers, community expectations, and the perceptions of the administrators on the possibility of releasing a teacher rated ineffective. The author concludes that administrators must not perceive the changes in the Education Code as providing "instant tenure"; otherwise selective retention will be precluded and the quality of instruction will diminish. Descriptors: Administrative Policy, Educational Legislation, Instructional Improvement, Probationary Period

Wilk, Roger E.; And Others (1969). A Study of Factors Operative in the Selective Retention of Students in Teacher Education. Part II. A longitudinal study (1956-62) of 4,948 education majors during their junior and senior years was conducted to identify biographical, academic, and psychometric factors characteristic of students who persist and student who do not persist in a teacher education curriculum. The data variables which were analyzed against the criterion of persistence were, in addition to the above-mentioned factors, from achievement test scores and postbaccalaureate questionnaires. Eight questions framed the collection and analysis of data. Results are of descriptive value, especially from questions regarding the characteristics of juniors entering the college of education, the number and location of students teaching after graduation, and the achievement levels of five standardized tests of juniors and seniors. Additional findings indicate the following: in determining differences between "persists" and "nonpersists," only overall grade point average contributed significantly, and information available at the time of admission is not an effective predictor; men and women who persisted had different patterns of scores, with high school rank being the most effective single variable; generally, persistence or nonpersistence could not be determined by achievement tests, even after adjustment was made for ability differences; and the pattern of significant gains in educational development differed but personality test scores did not differ among students grouped according to major fields.   [More]  Descriptors: Education Majors, Persistence, Research Needs, Teacher Persistence

PIERSON, ROBERT A. (1966). THE G.P.A. CRITERION AND SELECTIVE RETENTION IN TEACHER EDUCATION. TO DETERMINE WHETHER ARBITRARY GRADE-POINT AVERAGE CUT-OFF POINTS (E.G. 2.25) FOR ENTRANCE INTO TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAMS ARE UNFAIR TO PRESENT-DAY STUDENTS, NINETY 1966 COLLEGE SOPHOMORES WITH FRESHMAN-YEAR GPA'S BETWEEN 2.00 AND 2.09 WERE COMPARED TO THE SAME NUMBER OF 1961 SOPHOMORES WITH FRESHMAN-YEAR GPA'S BETWEEN 2.25 AND 2.34 USING (1) POSITION IN HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATING CLASS AND (2) FRESHMAN SCAT AND ACT SCORES AS CRITERION MEASURES. IT WAS HYPOTHESIZED THAT THE 1966 SOPHOMORES WOULD HAVE HIGHER RANKS AND SCORES BECAUSE PRESENT-DAY SELECTION AND ADMISSION POLICIES MAY HAVE MADE THEM BETTER PREPARED THAN THEIR PREDECESSORS. CONTRARY TO EXPECTATIONS, IT WAS FOUND THAT THE 1961 STUDENTS RANKED HIGHER IN THEIR GRADUATING CLASSES AND HAD HIGHER FRESHMAN TEST SCORES, ALTHOUGH THE DIFFERENCES WERE NOT SIGNIFICANT. IT IS THOUGHT THAT THE DISCREPANCY MIGHT BE ACCOUNTED FOR BY THE FACT THAT GRADING POLICIES MAY HAVE REMAINED INVARIANT OR MAY HAVE BECOME SOMEWHAT MORE STRINGENT WITH RESPECT TO THE FRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORE POPULATION OF 1966.   [More]  Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Admission Criteria, Aptitude Tests, Class Average

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